From 1 - 10 / 12
  • Categories  

    Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths at (LATITUDE: -77.794900, LONGITUDE: 166.334700). RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880165

  • Categories  

    The network collects Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data for the purposes of monitoring the New Zealand Geodetic Datum 2000 (NZGD2000), updating the national deformation model, and maintaining New Zealand’s relationship to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Antarctic GNSS data form part of the New Zealand campaign GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) surveys. Data have been collected by periodic campaign style GNSS surveys. High accuracy continuous Global Positioning System tracking stations in Antarctica: - Scott Base (SCTB - LINZ Geodetic Code) and was operational as of 29 October 2004. - Butcher Ridge (BURI- LINZ Geodetic Code) on 7 December 2007. - Minna Bluff (MIN0- LINZ Geodetic Code) on 31 January 2007. - Cape Roberts (ROB4- LINZ Geodetic Code) on 29 November 2005. Data are available in Receiver Independent Exchange Format (RINEX) files at 30 or 15 seconds sampling rate. GET DATA: https://www.geodesy.linz.govt.nz/positionz/?page=text GET DATA: https://www.linz.govt.nz/products-services/geodetic/positionz/positionz-real-time-service

  • Categories  

    Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths at (LATITUDE: -77.792300, LONGITUDE: 166.514900). RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880164

  • Categories  

    Geomagnetic measurements were established in Antarctica in 1957 as part of the International Geophysical Year and have continued until present. Geomagnetic data have been recorded continuously but for a gap in the data from 1959 until 1963. Since 1963, the components of the Earth’s magnetic field (H, D & Z) and the large variations in this field associated with the arriving charged particles which produce magnetic storms and aurora, have in principle been recorded continuously, with the quality improving as various upgrades were done. The instruments are still located at Scott Base. Because the surface volcanic rocks at Scott Base are strongly magnetised, two other sites are used for repeat measurements of the Earth's magnetic field - Cape Evans (first measured by Scott’s expedition in 1911) and Lake Vanda (first measured in 1974). The magnetic field is remeasured at these sites approximately every five years. This research project forms part of a global network of observatory magnetometers which provide information for the variation of the Earth's geomagnetic field on global and regional scales. Three component recordings of geomagnetic field variations are made, analysed and transmitted to international databases and individual researchers as appropriate. In the 2011/2012 season, we recorded the magnetic field at the Weir site by Lake Vanda, but the site at Astro A is now inaccessible and probably underwater, because the lake level has risen. We established a backup site called C Granite, slightly north-east of Weir, and on the same side of the Onyx River as the refuge huts. In the 2016/17 season, we recorded the magnetic field and took absolute magnetic measurements at the Vanda Weir & Vanda Granite sites over a four-day time period. We also conducted a set of absolute magnetic measurements at the repeat magnetic measurement site at the Cape Evans Magnetic Hut. In the 2022/2023 season, we took absolute magnetic measurements at the Weir and Granite sites at Lake Vanda. In the 2023/2024 season, we took absolute magnetic measurements at the Cape Evans Magnetic Hut. GET DATA: https://geomag.bgs.ac.uk/data_service/data/surveydata.shtml

  • Categories  

    Cosmogenic surface exposure chronologies were used to quantitatively constrain past rates of ice thinning, and the absolute timing of ice discharge and thinning events. We sampled glacial erratics and bedrock from Byrd Glacier (LW1 Nunatak, LW2 Nunatak, Lonewolf Nuntataks, Tiger Nunatak, Mt. Tadpole). Samples were analysed for their exposure history, and all sites contained glacial erratics. In particular, the Lonewolf Nunataks sites, which is located along the margin of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet revealed a plethora of glacial cobbles. Details of laboratory procedures can be found in the related publication. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.5701 GET DATA: https://version2.ice-d.org/antarctica/publication/1139/

  • Categories  

    Data provided here have been collected as part of the project "Measurements and Improved Parameterization of the Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flow through First-Year Sea Ice", OPP-0126007* and include measurements of temperature and various ice properties at selected sites in first-year and multiyear sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in the years 2002-2004. Data from earlier installations of thermistor chains for measurements of ice temperature carried out by the New Zealand team have also been included. Data files are in Microsoft Excel format, with individual worksheets for specific cores or temperature data sets. Detailed information and comments on data sampling location etc. are provided in the files. Further information on data collection, results etc. can be found in the following publications: Backstrom, L. G. E., and H. Eicken 2007, submitted, Capacitance probe measurements of brine volume and bulk salinity in first-year sea ice, Cold Reg. Sci. Tech. Pringle, D. J., H. Eicken, H. J. Trodahl, and L. G. E. Backstrom 2007, submitted, Thermal conductivity of landfast Antarctic and Arctic sea ice, J. Geophys. Res. Trodahl, H. J., S. O. F. Wilkinson, M. J. McGuinness, and T. G. Haskell 2001, Thermal conductivity of sea ice; dependence on temperature and depth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 1279-1282. Data are in Microsoft Excel format. Abbreviations: AH = Arrival Heights; CH = Camp Haskell (near Delbridge Islands); VUW = Victoria University Wellington; UAF = University Alaska Fairbanks. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ooUH9dPvWT66afFC51Cb0JOHg66rn0sy

  • Categories  

    Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across 11 depths (57 cm, 78.5 cm, 84.5 cm, 87.5 cm, 96.5 cm, 105.5 cm, 108.5 cm, 114.5 cm, 117.5 cm, 120.5 cm, 129.5 cm) at (LATITUDE: -77.781700, LONGITUDE: 166.315300): RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108

  • Categories  

    Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths from 20 cm to 207.5 cm at (latitude: -77.775800, longitude: 166.312800): RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108

  • Categories    

    A semi-autonomous sea ice monitoring station (SIMS) was deployed to record ice temperature profiles and snow depths throughout the winter to late spring portion of the sea ice cover's growth season. These data were used to quantify the factors that govern the rate at which the sea ice grows. These factors include the local air temperature, vertical temperature gradient in the sea ice, the thickness of the overlying snow cover and the properties of the water column at the ice / water interface. The ice temperature profiles were recorded by a custom-built temperature probe designed by the University of Otago. The Otago thermistor probe consisted of twenty thermistors contained within a ~ 2.5 m long, 10 mm diameter stainless steel tube. The spacing of the thermistors in the probe was variable. This dataset provides information on the growth of the landfast sea ice and how much of this growth was due to heat loss to the atmosphere vs heat loss to the ocean. Locations: lat:-75.275700, lon:164.067300 (2022/23) Sea ice salinity and fabric cores were collected to understand sea ice growth rates, and indicate the different types of landfast sea ice (e.g. columnar versus incorporated platelet) and to determine their relative vertical positions with the sea ice cover. Sea ice, sub ice platelet layer, snow and freeboard measurements were used to validate ice thicknesses determined by analysing the sea ice temperature profiles collected by the SIMS. Snow depths were measured with a Campbell Scientific ultrasonic sensor (SR50). VIEW DATA: https://seaice.otago.ac.nz/ice-temp-graph/contour/

  • Categories  

    AntAir ICE is an air temperature dataset for terrestrial Antarctica, the ice shelves, and the seasonal sea ice around Antarctica in a 1km2 spatial grid resolution and a daily temporal resolution available from 2003-2021. AntAir ICE was produced by modelling air temperature from MODIS ice surface temperature and land surface temperature using linear models. In-situ measurements of air temperature from 117 Automatic Weather Stations were used as the response variable. Each day has a bricked spatial raster with two layers, saved as a GeoTIFF format and in the Antarctic Polar Stereographic projection (EPSG 3031). The first layer is the predicted near surface air temperature for that day in degree Celsius * 10 and the second layer is the number of available MODIS scenes for that day ranging from 0 to 4. Areas with cloud contamination or without sea ice are marked with no data. Files for each year (2003-2021) are compressed with a ZIP files for each quarter. Python 3.8 was used for conversion of the MODIS products from HDF files to raster and all data handling and processing was thereafter done in R version 4.0.0. All data processing and modelling procedures are available as R scripts on a public Github repository: https://github.com/evabendix/AntAir-ICE. Using this code it is possible to download new available MODIS LST and IST scenes and apply the model to continue the near-surface air temperature dataset. Related Publication: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-023-02720-z GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.954750