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    The data set contains sea ice thickness (consolidated ice plus snow) of pack ice in the Western Ross Sea acquired by fixed wing aircraft (BT-67 C-GJKB) between McMurdo Sound (77.68 S / 165.52E) and near Cape Adare (72.01 S / 171.53 E). Two survey profiles are oriented South - North near parallel and about 100km off the Victoria Land coast, and two survey profiles are leading into Terra Nova Bay oriented in East –West direction at around 74.5 S and 75 S. The total length of the survey profiles is about 800 km. The Southern survey was flown from 9 November 2017 22:19 UTC to 10 November 2017 00:25 UTC beginning in McMurdo Sound and went for 300 km to the north, before turning west into Terra Nova Bay for another 100 km. The Northern survey was flown on 11 November 2017 from 1:21 UTC to 3:04 UTC from near the Adare Peninsula in a southerly direction for 215 km before turning southwest towards Cape Washington for another 140 km. The airborne electromagnetic induction (AEM) ice thickness sensor was towed by a Basler BT-67 aircraft sampling thickness every 6m along the flight track. The accuracy of the measured ice thickness is +/-0.1m over level ice. Ice thicknesses are biased up to 50% low for pressure ridges smaller than the signal footprint of about 45 m. Data was collected with the support of Antarctica New Zealand (event K066-1718-A; 25/10/2017-28/11/2017) for the New Zealand National Science Challenge Deep South (Targeted observation and process informed modelling of Antarctic sea ice, PI P. Langhorne). The purpose of data collection was to gain a basic understanding of sea ice thickness close to the areas of the Ross Sea, McMurdo, and Terra Nova Bay Polynyas.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The thicknesses of sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer were measured at regular intervals on fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November of 2016. Thirty-metre cross-profiles were established at each site, and snow depths were measured at 0.5 m intervals along the transect lines with a MagnaProbe. A mean snow depth for each site was derived from these 120 measurements. Freeboard, sea ice thickness and sub-ice platelet layer thickness were recorded at five locations at each site - at the central crossing point and at the end points of each transect. The mean of these was then calculated and taken as representative of the site. Ice thicknesses were measured by using a tape measure with a brass T-anchor attached at the zero mark. This was deployed vertically through the drill-hole and allowed to rotate to a horizontal alignment when exiting the bottom of the drill-hole at the ice-ocean interface. From this position the anchor is slowly pulled upwards until some resistance is met and the first measurement is taken. This resistance is taken to mark the sub-ice platelet layer/ocean interface. The tape measure is then pulled harder, forcing the bar to pass through the sub-ice platelet layer until it sits flush against the sea ice/sub-ice platelet layer interface where a second measurement is taken. Measurement sites were about 10 km apart.

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    Sea ice thickness and sub-ice platelet layer thickness under fast ice were measured at regular intervals at two North-South oriented profiles and four east-west oriented profiles in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November 2013. Holes were drilled at regular intervals into sea ice at measurement sites about 10 km apart. The thickness was measured using measurement tapes. Snow depth on sea ice was also measured at all sites

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    These data were aquired with a Terrestrial Radar Interferometer overlooking the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica. The time series contains differential interferograms with a 12h temporal baseline covering an approximately 8 day period in November 2018. Tidal modulation of ice streams and their adjacent ice shelves is a real-world experiment to understand ice-dynamic processes. We observe the dynamics of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) and GNSS. Ocean tides are predominantly diurnal but horizontal GNSS displacements oscillate also semi-diurnally. The oscillations are strongest in the ice shelf and tidal signatures decay near-linearly in the TRI data over >10 km upstream of the grounding line. Tidal flexing is observed >6 km upstream of the grounding line including cm-scale uplift. Tidal grounding line migration is small and <40 % of the ice thickness. The frequency doubling of horizontal displacements relative to the ocean tides is consistent with variable ice-shelf buttressing demonstrated with a visco-elastic Maxwell model. Taken together, this supports previously hypothesized flexural ice softening in the grounding-zone through tides and offers new observational constraints for the role of ice rheology in ice-shelf buttressing. Related Publication: Drews, R., Wild, C. T., Marsh, O. J., Rack, W., Ehlers, T. A., Neckel, N., & Helm, V. (2021). Grounding-zone flow variability of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, in a diurnal tidal regime. Geophysical Research Letters, 48, e2021GL093853. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL093853 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.935707

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    These data were aquired with a Terrestrial Radar Interferometer overlooking the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica. The time series contains differential interferograms with a 12h temporal baseline covering an approximately 8 day period in November 2018. Tidal modulation of ice streams and their adjacent ice shelves is a real-world experiment to understand ice-dynamic processes. We observe the dynamics of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) and GNSS. Ocean tides are predominantly diurnal but horizontal GNSS displacements oscillate also semi-diurnally. The oscillations are strongest in the ice shelf and tidal signatures decay near-linearly in the TRI data over >10 km upstream of the grounding line. Tidal flexing is observed >6 km upstream of the grounding line including cm-scale uplift. Tidal grounding line migration is small and <40 % of the ice thickness. The frequency doubling of horizontal displacements relative to the ocean tides is consistent with variable ice-shelf buttressing demonstrated with a visco-elastic Maxwell model. Taken together, this supports previously hypothesized flexural ice softening in the grounding-zone through tides and offers new observational constraints for the role of ice rheology in ice-shelf buttressing. Time series of line-of-sight flowfields averaged over approximately three hours. Data were taken with a Terrestrial Radar Interferometer in November 2018 at the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica – The Zip Archive contains 288 Geotiff in South polar stereographic projection – Each raster has 4027 x 4746 entries – The file name details the approximately 3h time inverval of aquisition with Stack_YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS_YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS marking the beginning and end of the time interval, respectively. – The line of sight velocities are given in meters per year Related Publication: Drews, R., Wild, C. T., Marsh, O. J., Rack, W., Ehlers, T. A., Neckel, N., & Helm, V. (2021). Grounding-zone flow variability of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, in a diurnal tidal regime. Geophysical Research Letters, 48, e2021GL093853. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL093853 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.935702

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    This is GNSS data of four stations covering the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier Antarctica. Tidal modulation of ice streams and their adjacent ice shelves is a real-world experiment to understand ice-dynamic processes. We observe the dynamics of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) and GNSS. Ocean tides are predominantly diurnal but horizontal GNSS displacements oscillate also semi-diurnally. The oscillations are strongest in the ice shelf and tidal signatures decay near-linearly in the TRI data over >10 km upstream of the grounding line. Tidal flexing is observed >6 km upstream of the grounding line including cm-scale uplift. Tidal grounding line migration is small and <40 % of the ice thickness. The frequency doubling of horizontal displacements relative to the ocean tides is consistent with variable ice-shelf buttressing demonstrated with a visco-elastic Maxwell model. Taken together, this supports previously hypothesized flexural ice softening in the grounding-zone through tides and offers new observational constraints for the role of ice rheology in ice-shelf buttressing. Related Publication: Drews, R., Wild, C. T., Marsh, O. J., Rack, W., Ehlers, T. A., Neckel, N., & Helm, V. (2021). Grounding-zone flow variability of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, in a diurnal tidal regime. Geophysical Research Letters, 48, e2021GL093853. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL093853 GET DATA: https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.936090

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    Ground-based electromagnetic induction (EM) surveys of sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer thicknesses were carried out on land-fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November of 2011, 2013, 2016 and 2017. The EM data was acquired using a frequency-domain Geonics Ltd EM31-MK2 instrument mounted on a sledge and towed by skidoo. The thicknesses of total ice (sea ice plus the snow layer) and the SPL were simultaneously retrieved from the EM31 measured response using the processing method of Irvin (2018) (refer to pages 89-98). A correction for the addition of the snow layer was applied to obtain to EM measured Sea Ice (emSI) thickness according to section 2.3 of Brett et al. 2019. Related Publication: Brett, G. M., Irvin, A., Rack, W., Haas, C., Langhorne, P. J., & Leonard, G. H. (2020). Variability in the distribution of fast ice and the sub-ice platelet layer near McMurdo Ice Shelf. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 125, e2019JC015678. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JC015678 GET DATA: https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.909889