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    Here, we present drill hole measurements carried out at 14 field sites distributed over a ~1500 km^2 area of fast ice in the south of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica between 1 and 19 November 2018. At each site, five holes were drilled in the fast ice at the centre and end points of two cross‐profile lines, each 30 metre long. Sea ice and SIPL thicknesses were measured with a suspended thickness probe and metal bar using the procedure described in Price et al. (2014). Snow depth measurements at centimetre accuracy were made at half‐metre intervals along the cross‐profiles using a metal ruler or a GPS‐equipped Magnaprobe. Sea ice freeboard (i.e., the height of the sea ice surface above sea level) was measured in each of the drill holes. The average value for each parameter was calculated at each field site to provide a representative measurement over the 30 metre cross-profile fast ice area. The drill hole measurements were used to underpin spatial distribution surveys of the aforementioned parameters, to inform electromagnetic induction forward and inverse models, and to ground-validate satellite altimetry assessments of fast ice freeboard and derived ice thickness in McMurdo Sound.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The thicknesses of sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer were measured at regular intervals on fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November of 2016. Thirty-metre cross-profiles were established at each site, and snow depths were measured at 0.5 m intervals along the transect lines with a MagnaProbe. A mean snow depth for each site was derived from these 120 measurements. Freeboard, sea ice thickness and sub-ice platelet layer thickness were recorded at five locations at each site - at the central crossing point and at the end points of each transect. The mean of these was then calculated and taken as representative of the site. Ice thicknesses were measured by using a tape measure with a brass T-anchor attached at the zero mark. This was deployed vertically through the drill-hole and allowed to rotate to a horizontal alignment when exiting the bottom of the drill-hole at the ice-ocean interface. From this position the anchor is slowly pulled upwards until some resistance is met and the first measurement is taken. This resistance is taken to mark the sub-ice platelet layer/ocean interface. The tape measure is then pulled harder, forcing the bar to pass through the sub-ice platelet layer until it sits flush against the sea ice/sub-ice platelet layer interface where a second measurement is taken. Measurement sites were about 10 km apart.

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    Sea ice thickness and sub-ice platelet layer thickness under fast ice were measured at regular intervals at two North-South oriented profiles and four east-west oriented profiles in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November 2013. Holes were drilled at regular intervals into sea ice at measurement sites about 10 km apart. The thickness was measured using measurement tapes. Snow depth on sea ice was also measured at all sites

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    The data are approximately 800 km of airborne electromagnetic survey of coastal sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer (SIPL) thickness distributions in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, from McMurdo Sound to Cape Adare. Data were collected between 8 and 13 November 2017, within 30 days of the maximum fast ice extent in this region. Approximately 700 km of the transect was over landfast sea ice that had been mechanically attached to the coast for at least 15 days. Most of the ice was first-year sea ice. Unsmoothed in-phase and quadrature components are presented at all locations. Data have been smoothed with an 100 point median filter, and in-phase and quadrature smoothed data are also presented at all locations. Beneath level ice it is possible to identify the thickness of an SIPL and a filter is described (Langhorne et al) to identify level ice. Level ice in-phase, quadrature and SIPL thickness, derived from these, are presented at locations of level ice. For rough ice, the in-phase component is considered the best measure of sea ice thickness. For level ice where there is the possibility of an SIPL, then the quadrature component is considered the best measure of ice thickness, along with SIPL thickness. All data are in meters.

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    Ground-based electromagnetic induction (EM) surveys of sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer thicknesses were carried out on land-fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November of 2011, 2013, 2016 and 2017. The EM data was acquired using a frequency-domain Geonics Ltd EM31-MK2 instrument mounted on a sledge and towed by skidoo. The thicknesses of total ice (sea ice plus the snow layer) and the SPL were simultaneously retrieved from the EM31 measured response using the processing method of Irvin (2018) (refer to pages 89-98). A correction for the addition of the snow layer was applied to obtain to EM measured Sea Ice (emSI) thickness according to section 2.3 of Brett et al. 2019. Related Publication: Brett, G. M., Irvin, A., Rack, W., Haas, C., Langhorne, P. J., & Leonard, G. H. (2020). Variability in the distribution of fast ice and the sub-ice platelet layer near McMurdo Ice Shelf. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 125, e2019JC015678. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JC015678 GET DATA: https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.909889

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    The thicknesses of sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer were measured at regular intervals on fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November and December of 2011. Thirty-metre cross-profiles were established at each site, and snow depths were measured at 0.5 m intervals along the transect lines with a metal ruler. A mean snow depth for each site was derived from these 120 measurements. Freeboard, sea ice thickness and sub-ice platelet layer thickness were recorded at five locations at each site - at the central crossing point and at the end points of each transect. The mean of these was then calculated and taken as representative of the site. Ice thicknesses were measured by using a tape measure with a brass T-anchor attached at the zero mark. This was deployed vertically through the drill-hole and allowed to rotate to a horizontal alignment when exiting the bottom of the drill-hole at the ice-ocean interface. From this position the anchor is slowly pulled upwards until some resistance is met and the first measurement is taken. This resistance is taken to mark the sub-ice platelet layer/ocean interface. The tape measure is then pulled harder, forcing the bar to pass through the sub-ice platelet layer until it sits flush against the sea ice/sub-ice platelet layer interface where a second measurement is taken. Measurement sites were about 5 km apart.