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    A sea level recorder and barometer was installed at Scott Base in January 2001 initially to support oceanographic and hazards research (including tsunami) and to support hydrographic surveying. The sea-level recorder is a nitrogen bubbler system with a paroscientific pressure transducer located on a bottom-mounted spigot of the osmosis boom (to enable lifting for maintenance), that ensures the orifice always returns to the same point. Sea level and atmospheric pressure and temperature are recorded at 5 minute intervals and stored every 24 hours. Each year the rise and fall of the sea ice is observed over a 2-3 day period during a spring tide using GPS. These measurements are related to a tide gauge benchmark and the sea surface to enable the reliability of the tide gauge to be checked. GET DATA: https://sealevel-data.linz.govt.nz/index.html?tidegauge=SCOT

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    Ultraviolet radiation measurements over the spectral region 290-450 nm with a high precision spectro-radiometer. The spectro-radiometer was installed at Arrival Heights as a two month (November 2006 – January 2007) blind inter-comparison with the established measurement programme run by Biospherical Instruments for the USAP. The data was compared with the USAP data taken simultaneously. These data are held internally by NIWA. GET DATA: contact dan.smale@niwa.co.nz

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    A tide gauge was installed in November 1990 and has been in near continuous operation since. A 10 minute average of water depth was recorded each hour with hourly averages of wind speed and direction, air temperature and solar radiation. From 2000 the recording frequency was increased from every hour to every 10 minutes. From 2003 data is read every 10 seconds and an average value (from 60 readings) is calculated every 5 minutes and recorded. Barometric pressure was measured as well, starting in 2003, with six barometric pressure readings made between 2 and 3 minutes in the 5-minute interval and averaged and recorded with the tide value. Each year the rise and fall of the sea ice is observed over a 2 - 3 day period during a spring tide using GPS. These measurements are related to a tide gauge bench mark and the sea surface to enable the reliability of the tide gauge to be checked. The tide gauge data is archived by Land Information New Zealand. GET DATA: https://sealevel-data.linz.govt.nz/index.html?tidegauge=ROBT

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    Radiolarians (holoplanktonic Protozoa) found in marine sediments are commonly used in Southern Ocean as palaeoclimate proxies. Generating such reconstructions of past climate based on radiolarian abundances requires a spatially and environmentally comprehensive reference dataset of modern radiolarian census counts. The Southern Ocean RADiolarian (SO-RAD) dataset includes census counts for 237 radiolarian taxa from 228 surface sediment samples located in the Atlantic, Indian and South-west Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean. This compilation is the largest radiolarian census dataset derived from surface sediment samples in the Southern Ocean. The SO-RAD dataset may be used as a reference dataset for palaeoceanographic reconstructions, or for studying modern radiolarian biogeography and species diversity. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-13-5441-2021

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    Measurements of chlorine monoxide (ClO) made with a Microwave Chlorine Monoxide Millimeter Wave Spectrometer (ground-based). The instrument (ClOe1) was established in January of 1996 at Scott Base and decommissioned in October 2023. A replacement radiometer (ClOe4) was installed at Scott Base in February 2023 (an overlap in the data for timeseries continuity purposes). These data are produced in collaboration with State University of New York (SUNY) Stoney Brook and Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). “Raw” data are times and recorded microwave emission spectra. “Derived” data are column amounts and vertical profile information of chlorine monoxide (ClO). The instrument has acquired the nickname "CloeTechnique" for vertical profile information uses "optimal estimation" to extract information from pressure broadening of ClO emission line. Significant failure in early 2018 only fixed in November 2018. No data in the July - October 2018 period. Data is held at NRL and in the NDACC database. Data are available as monthly .ndm files, and additional metadata are available in the header. Instrument timeline: - ClOe1 1996-2023 - ClOe4 2023 – present GET DATA: https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/ndacc/data.html?station=scott.base#

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    AntAir ICE is an air temperature dataset for terrestrial Antarctica, the ice shelves, and the seasonal sea ice around Antarctica in a 1km2 spatial grid resolution and a daily temporal resolution available from 2003-2021. AntAir ICE was produced by modelling air temperature from MODIS ice surface temperature and land surface temperature using linear models. In-situ measurements of air temperature from 117 Automatic Weather Stations were used as the response variable. Each day has a bricked spatial raster with two layers, saved as a GeoTIFF format and in the Antarctic Polar Stereographic projection (EPSG 3031). The first layer is the predicted near surface air temperature for that day in degree Celsius * 10 and the second layer is the number of available MODIS scenes for that day ranging from 0 to 4. Areas with cloud contamination or without sea ice are marked with no data. Files for each year (2003-2021) are compressed with a ZIP files for each quarter. Python 3.8 was used for conversion of the MODIS products from HDF files to raster and all data handling and processing was thereafter done in R version 4.0.0. All data processing and modelling procedures are available as R scripts on a public Github repository: https://github.com/evabendix/AntAir-ICE. Using this code it is possible to download new available MODIS LST and IST scenes and apply the model to continue the near-surface air temperature dataset. Related Publication: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-023-02720-z GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.954750

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    The AARDDVARK/WWLLN Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Sensor was installed at Arrival Heights from 10-15 December 2008 by Dr Craig J. Rodger and Dr. James Brundell as part of Antarctica New Zealand Event K069A. The sensor measures the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequency radio range (~500 Hz-50 kHz), and passes it to a PC which processes the data for the experiments. The primary experiment is the AARDDVARK observations, which measures powerful and distant communications transmitters operating in the VLF range. As such, the dataset is "narrowband", taking amplitude and phase measurements at the transmission frequencies. For this sensor, there is 0.2s time resolution. The Konsortia sensors detect changes in ionisation levels from ~30-85 km altitude, with the goal of increasing the understanding of energy coupling between the Earth's atmosphere, Sun, and Space. We use the upper atmosphere as a gigantic energetic particle detector to observe and understand changing energy flows; this Science area impacts our knowledge of global change, communications, and navigation. One of the few experimental techniques that can probe these altitudes uses very low-frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiation, trapped between the lower ionosphere (~85 km) and the Earth, and thus said to be propagating "subionospherically". The sensor is currently logging transmitters in the northern & southern hemispheres, over a very wide longitude range. Both experiments send the processed data across the internet. AARDDVARK observations are sent to the University of Otago once a day at an agreed time. The new AH receiver was the 10th station in the AARDDVARK network, jointly lead by the University of Otago and the British Antarctic Survey. Two near-orthogonal magnetic field loops measuring VLF electromagnetic waves. The centre of the antenna is at 77° 49.790' S, 166° 39.438' E, based on a GPS measurement with 1 m accuracy. Logging is undertaken with UltraMSK software running on a PC locked to GPS timing. GET DATA: https://space.physics.otago.ac.nz/aarddvark/

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    The WWLLN Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Sensor was installed at Scott Base in November 2015 by Dr. James Brundell and Ms. Emma Douma as part of Antarctica New Zealand Event K060-1516-A. The sensor measures the electric field in the Very Low Frequency radio range (~500 Hz-50 kHz) and passes it to a PC which processes the data for the experiments. The antenna is located behind the Hatherton lab. It was installed due to increasing manmade electromagnetic noise levels in the "quiet zone" at Arrival Heights. The observations from this antenna are now the primary WWLLN feed from Ross Island, the Arrival Height's magnetic field antenna is now a backup. WWLLN, uses the VLF feed but processes it to detect the radio-wave pulses from lightning. WWLLN observations are sent to a central processing computer to determine the time and location of lightning pulses all over the globe. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) is an experimental Very Low Frequency (VLF) network of sensors being developed through collaborations with research institutions across the globe. The network exploits the considerable electromagnetic power radiated by lightning as "sferics" present in the VLF band. By combining radio-pulse observations from at least 5 stations, the WWLLN central processing computers can determine the location of the original lightning discharge. As the radio-pulse observations are immediately sent back across the internet to the central processing computers locations are generated within ~10 s of the discharge, and thus near real time. There are currently about 70 active VLF receiving stations operating in the VLF World-Wide Lightning Location Network, including the Scott Base measurements. WWLLN observations are continuously transmitted to one of the WWLLN primary servers, in this case flash.ess.washington.edu at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. GET DATA: https://space.physics.otago.ac.nz/aarddvark/

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    Spectroscopic measurements of stratospheric gases Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Chlorine Dioxide (OCIO), Bromine Oxide (BrO) and Ozone (O3) using scattered sunlight. Airyx and Envimeas: A dual MAX-DOAS UV/visible wavelength diode array spectrometer is deployed to measure of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), chlorine dioxide (OClO) and bromine oxide (BrO). The instrument is a similar instrument to that of EnviMeas, and produces overlapping datasets with ADAS-2. Fixed azimuth direction, same as the Antarctic Diode Array spectrometer. System 2 (ADAS-2). The data are currently being held internally by NIWA. “Raw” data are times and recorded spectra of scattered light for several viewing directions. “Derived” data are column amount of NO2, OClO, BrO and O3, which can be split into tropospheric and stratospheric parts. This technique is sometimes referred to as MAX-DOAS Multiple-Axis Dual Optical Absorption Spectrometry. This work is carried out in collaboration the University of Heidelberg. ADAS2, Envimeas and Airyx measurements: UV/visible Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) diode array spectrometers making measurements of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), chlorine dioxide (OClO) and bromine oxide (BrO). JY: A scanning grating UV/Vis monochromator taking measurements of total slant column of NO2 and Ozone using scattered zenith sunlight. ADAS: A CCD grating UV/Vis grating Acton spectrometer making measurements of total slant column NO2, BrO, OClO and ozone made using scattered light zenith sunlight. Pandora: Direct sun UV/Vis measurements of ozone and NO2. Campaign to test feasibility of long term deployment at Arrival Heights. Instrument timeline JY: 1982 -2023 ADAS: 1993 - 2017 ADAS2: 1998 - present Pandora: 2015 Aug – Oct. Airyx & Envimeas : 2018 – present O3, OCIO and BrO data are in the process of being archived - please contact Richard Querel for data access. NO2 data is available via the "GET DATA" link. GET DATA: https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/ndacc/data.html?station=arrival.heights

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    Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths at (LATITUDE: -77.794900, LONGITUDE: 166.334700). RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880165