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    Measurements of partial and total column of several atmospheric trace gases (e.g.O3, HCl, N2O, CH4, HNO3, ClONO2, HCN, HF, OCS, CO, C2H6, CFC-11, CFC-12, COF2 + others). Measurements are made with Bruker Fourier transform spectrometers, using direct sunlight (or moonlight) at infrared wavelengths (700-10000cm-1). The Bruker FTS instruments have two liquid nitrogen cooled detectors (inSb & HgCdTe) and six optical filters. For 2014-2016 seasons, operated in parallel with Bruker 120M for intercomparison studies. Bruker 120M will then be retried. Bruker 125HR will replace it. Data are routinely analysed for HNO3, HCl, CH4, N2O, CO, ClONO2, HF, C2H6, HCN, and 10+ other species measurable. Information on other trace gases is contained in the spectra, not yet analysed/retrieved. “Raw” data are times and recorded interferograms which are Fourier transformed into spectra. “Derived” data are column amounts, and in some cases limited vertical profile information, of atmospheric trace gases. Technique for vertical profile information uses "optimal estimation" to extract information from pressure broadening of absorption lines: SFIT2/SFIT4. The original solar tracker was replaced with a newer tracker in December 2017, active tracking of sun now possible. A Bruker EM27-Sun operated for a summer season at AHTS, to access capability. Measurements of total column CO2, CH4 and CO. Data archived as part of the COCCON network. Instrument timeline: - Bomen DA2 FTS 1990-1994 (HNO3 and HCl only) - Bruker 120M: 1996-2016 - Bruker 125HR: 2015 – present - EM27-Sun: Campaign based low resolution instrument (CO2, CH4 and CO only). February 2016 and then November 2020 – February 2021 GET DATA: https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/ndacc/data.html?station=arrival.heights GET DATA (EM27-Sun): https://www.imk-asf.kit.edu/english/COCCON.php

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    A sea level recorder and barometer was installed at Scott Base in January 2001 initially to support oceanographic and hazards research (including tsunami) and to support hydrographic surveying. The sea-level recorder is a nitrogen bubbler system with a paroscientific pressure transducer located on a bottom-mounted spigot of the osmosis boom (to enable lifting for maintenance), that ensures the orifice always returns to the same point. Sea level and atmospheric pressure and temperature are recorded at 5 minute intervals and stored every 24 hours. Each year the rise and fall of the sea ice is observed over a 2-3 day period during a spring tide using GPS. These measurements are related to a tide gauge benchmark and the sea surface to enable the reliability of the tide gauge to be checked. GET DATA: https://sealevel-data.linz.govt.nz/index.html?tidegauge=SCOT

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    Radiolarians (holoplanktonic Protozoa) found in marine sediments are commonly used in Southern Ocean as palaeoclimate proxies. Generating such reconstructions of past climate based on radiolarian abundances requires a spatially and environmentally comprehensive reference dataset of modern radiolarian census counts. The Southern Ocean RADiolarian (SO-RAD) dataset includes census counts for 237 radiolarian taxa from 228 surface sediment samples located in the Atlantic, Indian and South-west Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean. This compilation is the largest radiolarian census dataset derived from surface sediment samples in the Southern Ocean. The SO-RAD dataset may be used as a reference dataset for palaeoceanographic reconstructions, or for studying modern radiolarian biogeography and species diversity. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-13-5441-2021

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    The AARDDVARK/WWLLN Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Sensor was installed at Arrival Heights from 10-15 December 2008 by Dr Craig J. Rodger and Dr. James Brundell as part of Antarctica New Zealand Event K069A. The sensor measures the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequency radio range (~500 Hz-50 kHz), and passes it to a PC which processes the data for the experiments. The primary experiment is the AARDDVARK observations, which measures powerful and distant communications transmitters operating in the VLF range. As such, the dataset is "narrowband", taking amplitude and phase measurements at the transmission frequencies. For this sensor, there is 0.2s time resolution. The Konsortia sensors detect changes in ionisation levels from ~30-85 km altitude, with the goal of increasing the understanding of energy coupling between the Earth's atmosphere, Sun, and Space. We use the upper atmosphere as a gigantic energetic particle detector to observe and understand changing energy flows; this Science area impacts our knowledge of global change, communications, and navigation. One of the few experimental techniques that can probe these altitudes uses very low-frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiation, trapped between the lower ionosphere (~85 km) and the Earth, and thus said to be propagating "subionospherically". The sensor is currently logging transmitters in the northern & southern hemispheres, over a very wide longitude range. Both experiments send the processed data across the internet. AARDDVARK observations are sent to the University of Otago once a day at an agreed time. The new AH receiver was the 10th station in the AARDDVARK network, jointly lead by the University of Otago and the British Antarctic Survey. Two near-orthogonal magnetic field loops measuring VLF electromagnetic waves. The centre of the antenna is at 77° 49.790' S, 166° 39.438' E, based on a GPS measurement with 1 m accuracy. Logging is undertaken with UltraMSK software running on a PC locked to GPS timing. GET DATA: https://space.physics.otago.ac.nz/aarddvark/

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    In collaboration between Korea Polar Research Institute and NIWA, an oceanographic mooring was deployed to the south of the Drygalski Ice Tongue (lat:-75.488417, lon:163.174350) on 12 February 2017 as a part of the ANA07C research cruise, and it was recovered on 7 March 2018. To monitor physical properties (Temperature, Salinity, Current) of ocean water in the south of the Drygalski Ice Tongue. GET DATA: https://kpdc.kopri.re.kr/search/9245184f-b187-4c1e-ad6f-32ed1f9493c8

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    In collaboration between the Korea Polar Research Institute and NIWA, an oceanographic mooring was deployed to the North of the Drygalski Ice Tongue (lat:-75.360767, lon:164.746467) on March 2020, and it was recovered on March 2022 (ANA12D research cruise). To monitor physical properties (Temperature, Salinity, Current) of ocean water in the north of the Drygalski Ice Tongue. GET DATA: https://kpdc.kopri.re.kr/search/3e3f6f5f-4989-4263-b351-d8df3b1e0471

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    Altitude profile measurements of water vapour, ozone and aerosols using balloon packages flown through the troposphere into the stratosphere as part of the Ross Island GRUAN site activities. Maximum altitude recorded was 29 km. This project is a collaboration between the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and NOAA. Timeline: - November 2022: 2 flights - February 2023: 1 flight - October 2023: 3 flights Data are held internally at NIWA and NOAA, and will be stored in the GRUAN database (https://www.gruan.org/data) GET_DATA: https://www.gruan.org/data

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    In collaboration between the Korea Polar Research Institute and NIWA, an oceanographic mooring was deployed close to the bottom depth near the Drygalski Ice Tongue (lat:-75.275700, lon:164.067300) on 9 March 2018 as a part of the ANA08C research cruise, and it was recovered on 3 January 2019 To monitor physical properties(Temperature, Salinity, Current) of deep water near the Drygalski Ice Tongue. To monitor physical properties (Temperature, Salinity, Current) of deep water near the Drygalski Ice Tongue. GET DATA: https://kpdc.kopri.re.kr/search/9826749c-376a-4751-8812-702cec76c4c0

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    In collaboration between Korea Polar Research Institute and NIWA, an oceanographic mooring was deployed close to the bottom depth near the Drygalski Ice Tongue (lat:-75.275700, lon:164.067300) on 9 March 2018 as a part of the ANA08C research cruise, and it was recovered on 3 January 2019. To monitor physical properties (Temperature, Salinity, Current) of deep water near the Drygalski Ice Tongue. GET DATA: https://kpdc.kopri.re.kr/search/9826749c-376a-4751-8812-702cec76c4c0

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    The AARDDVARK/WWLLN Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Sensor was installed at Arrival Heights from 10-15 December 2008 by Dr Craig J. Rodger and Dr. James Brundell as part of Antarctica New Zealand Event K069a. The sensor measures the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequency radio range (~500 Hz-50 kHz), and passes it to a PC which processes the data for the experiments. The primary experiment is the AARDDVARK observations. The secondary experiment, WWLLN, uses exactly the same VLF feed but processes it to detect the radio-wave pulses from lightning. WWLLN observations are sent to a central processing computer to determine the time and location of lightning pulses all over the globe. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) is an experimental Very Low Frequency (VLF) network of sensors being developed through collaborations with research institutions across the globe. The network exploits the considerable electromagnetic power radiated by lightning as "sferics" present in the VLF band. By combining radio-pulse observations from at least 5 stations, the WWLLN central processing computers can determine the location of the original lightning discharge. As the radio-pulse observations are immediately sent back across the internet to the central processing computers locations are generated within ~10 s of the discharge, and thus near real time. There are currently about 70 active VLF receiving stations operating in the VLF World-Wide Lightning Location Network, including the "Scott Base" measurements made at Arrival Heights or near the Hatherton Lab (depending on noise levels). WWLLN observations are continuously transmitted to one of the WWLLN primary servers, in this case flash.ess.washington.edu at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. Two near-orthogonal magnetic field loops measuring VLF electromagnetic waves. The centre of the antenna is at 77° 49.790' S, 166° 39.438' E, based on a GPS measurement with 1 m accuracy. Logging is undertaken with standard WWLLN software, with GPS timing. GET DATA: https://wwlln.net/